Mindful Reading

Retrieved from Goodreads.com 6/18/15 Copyright Gunaratana, B., & Gunaratana, H. (2011). Mindfulness in plain English. Simon and Schuster. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/64369.Mindfulness_in_Plain_English

Retrieved from Goodreads.com 6/18/15 Copyright Gunaratana, B., & Gunaratana, H. (2011). Mindfulness in plain English. Simon and Schuster.

 

MINDFULNESS IN PLAIN ENGLISH 

by Henepola Gunaratana

Mindfulness in Plain English is the foundation upon which all of my other book recommendations are built. Bhante G, as he is known to his followers, is a Sri Lankan Buddhist monk. His book is the ultimate distillate of the practice and philosophy of mindfulness. The book can be used to build a new mindfulness practice or refine an old one. I have yet to read a book that so clearly and succinctly sums up the complexities inherent to the practice of mindfulness.

 

 

 


Retrieved from Goodreads.com 6/18/15 Copyright Singer, M. (2007). The untethered soul: The journey beyond yourself. New Harbinger Publications. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1963638.The_Untethered_Soul?from_search=true&search_version=service

Retrieved from Goodreads.com 6/18/15 Copyright Singer, M. (2007). The untethered soul: The journey beyond yourself. New Harbinger Publications.

 

THE UNTETHERED SOUL

by Michael Singer

Perhaps the most lucid discourse on the illusory nature of the Self, The Untethered Soul, provides a deceptively simple tour through our own mind.  Singer provides very effective analogies that help the reader appreciate immensely complex concepts without resorting to wordy explanations.  The concepts can sometimes seem redundant but this is only a result of Singer’s attempt to emphasize vital points that are too easily missed.  The Untethered Soul teaches the reader to develop just enough distance from the Self to gain mastery over it as a separate and pliable entity.

 

 

 


Retrieved from Goodreads.com 6/18/15 Copyright Mingyur, R. Y., Swanson, E., & Goleman, D. (2008). The joy of living: Unlocking the secret and science of happiness. Harmony Books. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/289448.The_Joy_of_Living?from_search=true&search_version=service

Retrieved from Goodreads.com 6/18/15 Copyright Mingyur, R. Y., Swanson, E., & Goleman, D. (2008). The joy of living: Unlocking the secret and science of happiness. Harmony Books.

 

THE JOY OF LIVING

by Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche

This is one of my favorite Buddhist texts.  Mingyur (“Rinpoche” means “highly respected one” in Tibetan) is a Tibetan Buddhist monk who has a strong personal interest in science.  In The Joy of Living, Mingyur discusses the science behind meditation and examines the metaphysical parallels between quantum mechanics and Buddhist philosophy.  He also provides practical exercises for the reader to practice.  The balance between esoteric and practical is invaluable.  The writing is clear and concise and provides an enjoyable read.

 

 

 


Retrieved from Goodreads.com 6/18/15 Copyright Katie, B. (2003). Loving what is: Four questions that can change your life. Harmony Books. https://www.goodreads.com/book/photo/9762.Loving_What_Is

Retrieved from Goodreads.com 6/18/15 Copyright Katie, B. (2003). Loving what is: Four questions that can change your life. Harmony Books.

 

LOVING WHAT IS: FOUR QUESTIONS THAT CAN CHANGE YOUR LIFE

by Byron Katie

Out of all the books that I have read I have returned to Byron Katie’s Loving What Is the most. Katie’s book provides a wonderfully practical framework for dealing with the incredible convolutions of our thoughts. My post The Opposite Game was inspired by the four questions and the turn around exercise contained within Loving What Is.

 

 

 

 

 


Retrieved from Goodreads.com 6/18/15 Copyright Tolle, E. (2004). The power of now: A guide to spiritual enlightenment. New World Library. https://www.goodreads.com/book/photo/6708.The_Power_of_Now

Retrieved from Goodreads.com 6/18/15 Copyright Tolle, E. (2004). The power of now: A guide to spiritual enlightenment. New World Library.

 

THE POWER OF NOW

by Eckhart Tolle

The Power of Now was the book that opened the flood gates for my own self exploration.  Tolle examines the plastic and ephemeral nature of the Self.  The Power of Now draws from Taoism, Buddhism, Christian Mysticism, and many other traditions for inspiration.  Tolle is a compelling writer who at times can be complex so persistence is key when beginning this book.  The thesis made me question all that I had held as immutable truth.  And with those questions I was set free to enjoy the Self as a playful and pliable creation rather than a rigid character structure.  Tolle’s follow up A New Earth: Awakening to your life’s purpose is also an excellent read.

 

 


Retrieved from Amazon.com 6/18/15 Copyright Lau, D. C. (1989). Tao te ching. Chinese University Press. http://www.amazon.com/dp/014044131X/ref=rdr_ext_tmb

Retrieved from Amazon.com 6/18/15 Copyright Lau, D. C. (1989). Tao te ching. Chinese University Press.

 

TAO TE CHING

by Lao-Tzu translated by D.C. Lau

This is my favorite version of the famous Tao Te Ching (pronounced “dow de jing”). Lao Tzu (Tzu meaning “master” or “honored one” in Chinese) is said to have wrote these eighty-one verses around 600 BCE. The Tao Te Ching requires multiple readings to fully appreciate its almost infinite depth.  Lao Tzu is able to connote profound philosophical concepts while retaining a wonderful sense of humor.

 

 

 

 


Retrieved from Amazon.com 6/18/15 Copyright Suzuki, S. (2010). Zen mind, beginner's mind. Shambhala Publications. Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind

Retrieved from Amazon.com 6/18/15 Copyright Suzuki, S. (2010). Zen mind, beginner’s mind. Shambhala Publications.

 

ZEN MIND, BEGINNER’S MIND

by Shunryu Suzuki

Shunryu Suzuki’s seminal book on Zen Buddhism is an excellent starting point for those new to the philosophy.  Zen abolishes so many of the mental constructs that we are accustomed to relying on for the day to day understanding of life that relating Zen’s essence to a new reader can be very difficult.  Suzuki has accomplished this task by using simple language and providing practical examples.  He never mentions the concept of satori or other complex Zen components and instead tries to provide a glimpse of Zen for the initiated.  For those more familiar with Zen Buddhism this book will provide page after page of hidden gems.